Timeline


RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

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PRODUCTION SYSTEMS PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

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PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION - PHASE-1 (PRODUCTION EXPANDS TO 200 UNITS YEARLY)

 

* PHASE-1:

  • total Office area: 20,600 sq. ft.; finished offices: 10,300 sq. ft.

  • Production Area: 67,200 sq. ft.

** PHASE-2:

  • Offices infill: 10,300 sq. ft.

  • Production Area: 67,200 sq. ft.

  • Total production area: 134,400 sq. ft.

PHASE-1 EXPANSION & PHASE-2 DEVELOPMENT (PRODUCTION EXPANDS TO 300 UNITS YEARLY)

PHASE-2 EXPANSION (PRODUCTION EXPANDS TO 1,800 UNITS YEARLY)

 

 
 

 

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

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Product Availability – There is practically no affordable housing in the mountains near Colorado’s resorts. Real estate values are well beyond the reach of workers because of the demand for resort housing. This problem also plagues the metropolitan areas. The Colorado Housing and Finance Authority indicated that the problem with affordable housing was available land and a delivery system. The housing industry is geared to provide free market housing, not affordable housing. Colorado averages over 30,000 housing units annually, yet the Colorado Department of Housing estimates there is a need for over 2,000 affordable housing units. Unless a for-profit builder can make a profit above and beyond what’s needed to pay taxes and investors, there is no reason to stay in business. A nonprofit organization has virtually no tax burden, can joint venture projects with other nonprofit groups, raise interest-free capital which does not have to be repaid, and does not have to raise the price of its housing to maximize the return on investment for its investor group.

 

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Construction Systems and Methods - Residential construction systems used in the U.S. are primarily wood framing (86%) and other systems (15%) consisting of light-gauge steel framing, cast concrete, brick and log construction. Although light-gauge steel framing has been used in commercial construction for over 80 years, it has not been used much in residential construction. In the last 10 years, however, more and more builders have been using light-gauge steel framing in residential construction.

Why don’t more builders use light-gauge steel framing? Tradition. Most homebuilders use wood; workers are trained in wood construction and have woodworking construction tools. The lumber industry is huge and utilizes their massive marketing, research and technology power to maintain their role in housing construction. Since the 1980s, builders have had a tough time finding quality wood products. Wood producers have responded with engineered wood products, expansion of forest harvest areas and improvements in forest management. However, wood construction is more labor-intensive. An estimated 15% - 25% of the labor in wood frame construction is spent sorting and selecting suitable lumber. Plus there is additional time spent to replace lumber that warps or splits after installation. Residential construction methods, such as concrete, brick and log construction, are even more labor-intensive. And all these methods require specialized equipment and additional engineering.

When analyzing the viability of a construction system, you have to look at material handling, availability and quality, and installation labor requirements. Using these guidelines, light-gauge steel framing is the preferred choice. Light-gauge steel framing is primarily made from recycled steel and so weighs roughly 60% less than comparable wood materials. Steel is dimensionally stable, does not warp or twist, and therefore never has to be replaced after installation. No known insects affect steel, so it can be used worldwide. Galvanized steel is more corrosion-resistant than the steel nails used in wood construction, so the structure has a longer useful life. And the energy efficiency of steel framing with "open web" designs used in exterior walls is equal to or better than the thermal qualities of wood.

 

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Design Analysis and Project Options - Since the mid 1950s, factory-assembled housing, while very affordable, typically is constructed using standards that are below International Building Code, minimal materials and generally low standards of craftsmanship. Hardly anyone has developed designs that are visually pleasing or floor plans that actually accommodate the intended use.

We carefully analyzed both existing factory housing and site-built housing. We found that factory housing could be altered to meet the standards of quality and design associated with custom designed, site-built housing without increasing costs. Bayridge’s design team—representing over 75 years of architectural design and production experience—analyzed the state's housing market and developed 250 buildable modular single- and multi-family designs, as well as designs for light commercial and office buildings.

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Proof of Concept – Bayridge completed three projects to demonstrate the viability of our housing designs and our ability to meet special or specific project requirements. The concept pilot modular housing projects consisted of a custom-designed single-family home, a daycare center that met Colorado child health and safety standards, and several variations of migrant-worker housing. The migrant-worker housing was unique in that it had to comply with OSHA. HUD and UBC requirements, and meet specific social requirements of the mixed cultures of the migrant workers.

 

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PRODUCTION SYSTEMS PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

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Floor Framing and Primary Assembly - A fixed-base floor framing and primary assembly process eliminates assembly line delays, which occur when material flows and labor requirements do not go as planned. To eliminate any delays on one project from impacting any of the others, we developed a single point, non-moving assembly system. The fixed-point assembly system also improves quality because the foundation remains perfectly square and level from start to finish. Bayridge uses proprietary material handling systems are utilized to reduce labor and improve worker safety. Design of this system is 100% complete.

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Component Framing System uses light-gauge galvanized steel components in wall frames, floor systems and roof trusses. Light-gauge steel framing components may be produced either in-house using available production machinery, or purchased directly from one of several different manufacturers. Bayridge’s component framing system uses a combination of existing production equipment and proprietary materials handling systems. Design of this system is 100% complete.

 

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Wallboard Installation System consists of wallboard materials handling systems, wall frame alignment jigs and installation systems. Pre-assembled wall sections from the wall framing system are placed in the alignment jigs and wallboard is applied using the installation system. The unique feature of the wallboard installation system is its material-handling capabilities. Using the system, a team of six workers, each able to lift 20 pounds, can install the wallboard in a 1,500 sq. ft. house in about six hours. Using traditional methods, this is a multi-day project done by some of the strongest workers in construction. Design of this system is 90% complete.

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Roof Framing and Assembly System consists of framing alignment jigs, a ceiling board support system and an assembled roof/ceiling lift-transport system. This system allows construction on the roof/ceiling elements to occur simultaneously with the other components of the project. Design of this system is 95% complete.

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Bridge Crane System transports completed construction elements from one assembly area to another. This system is capable of moving loads up to 14 tons from any point in the production building to any other point. Sub-systems of the bridge crane system are used to install large building components from adjacent staging areas directly to the floor assembly. Design of this system is 100% complete.

 

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Electrical, Plumbing and HVAC Systems utilize a combination of the most innovative products available in the construction industry as well as proprietary installation equipment and procedures. All systems are installed during production. Design of this system is 100% complete.

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Production Building and Offices are designed specifically to meet the needs of the housing and community development program in Colorado. The 20,600 sq. ft., two-story office building will have employee support areas, conference rooms,  and administrative office space on the first floor. The facility can expand to the unfinished second floor in the future. The 67,200 sq. ft. production building can be expanded to 134,400 sq. ft. as demand increases. The design of offices and production buildings in other countries may be configured specifically to meet local production requirements. Design of this system is 90% complete.

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PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION - PHASE-1

We need approximately 15 acres of land to accommodate the office and production facility. We evaluated point of manufacturing costs and transportation costs vs. point of use quantities to determine the optimum location. The site has sufficient land to accommodate future expansion. Site planning is 90% complete.

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Production Building, Office and Systems construction will begin upon receipt of project funding, and will take eight to eleven months to complete. We will fabricate and order all the production equipment and systems when construction begins. A detailed project schedule will insure timely completion of all project elements.

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Production Start-up begins with a select group of experienced construction personnel. These professionals will in turn serve as production supervisors and trainers as production requirements increase. Production is scheduled to increase to 200 units within 18 months of start-up. Production will continue to increase as additional crews are trained.

 

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We will engage in Joint Venture Projects with local housing authorities, and private nonprofit housing groups. Bayridge will provide full project development services including feasibility analysis, design and planning, and project management.

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Program Training for international groups will begin within three years of completion of initial production facility. Bayridge’s housing and community development program is designed to be passed along and used by other groups in other geographic areas. The design of the production building and all production equipment is flexible enough to accommodate most any housing design or style. This flexibility allows the production of housing specific to the needs and requirements of any cultural group. Graduates of the program will return to their own countries to set up and implement a similar program. Each local community planning and housing development program will then train other communities in the country. The training program is the key to international expansion of housing and community development.

 

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PHASE-1 EXPANSION & PHASE-2 DEVELOPMENT

Production Expansion will continue until we achieve maximum production capacity in the facilities developed in Phase-1. Once we complete Phase-2 facilities, production will continue to increase at a rate consistent with optimum operating procedures. Careful planning will insure that product quality will not suffer because of expanding production.

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Phase-2 Development is the construction of 67,200 sq. ft. of production space, finishing the second floor of the office building and additional employee parking. Completion of the building and installation of production equipment and systems is expected to take six months. This work will not impact ongoing production.

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Joint Venture Projects with local housing authorities and private nonprofit housing groups continue as in Phase-1. Additionally, joint venture projects with for-profit developers will be implemented. Most communities are requiring for-profit housing subdivision developers to designate between 5% and 20% of their lots or units as affordable. Bayridge’s joint venture agreements with these groups allow them to meet the affordable housing requirements established by the community.

 

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PHASE-2 EXPANSION

Production Expansion will continue until maximum production capacity is achieved in the facilities developed through the completion of Phase-2. Careful planning will insure that production expansion does not occur at the expense of product quality.

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